Kick Off Your Training Season Right

It’s here, it’s here! The time we’ve been waiting for for months! No, I don’t mean Christmas or summertime or even daylight savings. I mean the challenging, exhilarating, sometimes anxiety-provoking days of race training.

If you’ve got a race or two (or five- cough cough race addiction) lined up for the fall, it’s about that time to buckle down and get your ish in gear. Here are a few tips to kick off your training months with the energy and drive you’ll need to succeed.

  1. Choose your plan (read about the best ones here) & have all pace deets lined up from the get-go. Jot down your different pace goals for each type of run (easy runs vs. long runs vs. race pace runs) so you can quickly glance each time you head out the door- it’s easy to get these numbers and times all jumbled up in your head. Keep these pace goals flexible, however; you’ll likely need to adjust later on.
  2. If possible, start your training plan a few weeks early. I’m just about to start an 18-week plan for a marathon that’s 21 weeks away, leaving me a nice 3 -week buffer. This comes in handy when you A) feel less-than-satisfied with how a week of training went and want a second go at it,  B) need a week of R&R to avoid turning a minor injury into a major injury, C) have a summer vacay and really, really feel that training will cramp your beaching & brunching style, or D) all of the above. No shame. I choose D. Every time.
  3. Find a way to stay motivated- any system that works for you. I like to print my training plan in a one-page table and highlight each day that I complete. The girly girl in me loves seeing all of the boxes turn hot pink, and the OCD in me hates seeing that one lonely, white box that marks a missed run. So simple, yet so motivating.  Or consider setting up a reward system, treating yourself to a massage, new running gear, or those cute new Ray-Bans you’ve been eyeing after every X successful training weeks. Just be careful not to let your prizes keep you from taking a break when your body’s about to crumble.
  4. Modify your training on a weekly basis. If you try to figure it out on the go, you’re more likely to miss some crucial runs and end up overwhelmed and frustrated. Instead, sit down every Sunday and think about the week ahead. Swap days around, if necessary, taking into account your work schedule and other commitments that may make training on some days harder than others. Be realistic; you probably won’t feel up to that mid-week 8-miler on the same day that you have back-to-back-to-back meetings and a hair appointment. Don’t set yourself up for failure!
  5. Book some run-dates. Get the scoop on which of your runner friends are training for races too, and compare training plans. Set up dates to run together whenever you can- the more regular, the better! Have friends training for a longer or shorter distance than you? Work your schedule so you can run your easy runs on the day of their long runs, or vice versa. I run twice a week with two different friends, and this is by far the most fool-proof way to stay motivated and entertained ’til the end.

Most importantly, listen to your body and enjoy the ride! Celebrate every success, no matter how small, and take the time to truly appreciate the good you are doing for your body and mind. Happy training! See you at the start. 🙂

Find Your Perfect Race Training Plan

So you’ve decided to train for a race. You’ve done all the volleying back and forth (do I have enough time? can my body handle it? do I really want to give up my weekend mornings for the next 8-16 weeks?) and settled on YES (which, fortunately, is the best answer 🙂 ). You’ve picked out the perfect race based on your calendar, travel plans, and of course, a preview of the finisher’s medal (that’s why we all run races anyway, isn’t it?). Now, it’s time to pick a training plan.

Here’s where I save you hours of grueling internet research and temporary cross-eye from scanning a million tiny charts of numbers, squinting to determine what sets them all apart. Who has the best running training plans? Hal Higdon.

Hal Higdon is a trainer and former Runner’s World contributor who’s created a fantastic selection of training plans for anything from 5Ks to marathons. Finding one that works for you is like finding something you like on The Cheesecake Factory’s menu: with so many options, there’s got to be something perfect. Continue reading